eUpdate Articles Tagged: rangeland


Sericea lespedeza control in rangeland, pasture, and CRP

pasture rangeland weeds weed control 

Control woody plants on rangeland: Basal bark and cut-stump herbicide applications

herbicide woody plants rangeland 

Control woody plants on rangeland: Basal bark and cut-stump herbicide applications

Fall can be an excellent time to treat unwanted stands of woody plants on rangeland. Learn about two different treatment methods: basal bark and cut-stump applications.

woody plants rangeland 

Identification and control of buckbrush and western snowberry in Kansas

Buckbrush and western snowberry are native shrubs found in Kansas. Both species occur on rangelands and as an understory species in woodlands. Buckbrush and western snowberry are generally considered undesirable in areas being grazed by cattle.

rangeland buckbrush snowberry shrubs 

Control woody plants on rangeland: Basal bark and cut-stump herbicide applications

Late summer and fall can be an excellent time to treat unwanted stands of woody plants. Scattered stands of individual trees should either be treated individually using the basal bark method or the cut stump treatment method.

woody plants rangeland herbicide application 

Profiles in Soil: Home on the Range with the Lancaster soil

This article highlights the Lancaster soil series. This soil is found throughout central Kansas, mainly on hillslopes. An eye-catching feature of the Lancaster are the bright red colors seen throughout its profile. Learn more about this Kansas rangeland soil in this article: Profiles in Soil.

soil rangeland 

Management following a wildfire

rangeland wind erosion wildfire cropland 

Considerations for Pasture Turn-out

It has been a late spring in 2022 across most of Kansas. Lack of fall and winter moisture has delayed plant growth this spring. Now the question is when should I turn-out livestock on my pastures? Historically, this decision has been referred to as range readiness, especially on seasonally grazed pastures. Range readiness occurs when plants have had the opportunity to make good growth and grazing may begin without damage to the vegetation or soil. As pastures start to green-up the temptation is to start grazing as soon as possible. Initially, plants use stored food reserves to start growth. Read more about how to make the best decision for your pastures and livestock considerations.

cattle pasture rangeland 


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