eUpdate Articles Tagged: anhydrous ammonia


Considerations for fall applications of anhydrous ammonia

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Soil and plant considerations for late applications of anhydrous ammonia

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Considerations for fall applications of anhydrous ammonia

Fall fertilizer applications hold some appeal to producers in Kansas. When applying anhydrous ammonia in the fall, there are a few factors to consider. These factors include soil temperature, texture, and moisture.

fall fertilizer anhydrous ammonia 

Can dry soils affect anhydrous ammonia applications in Kansas?

Producers are getting ready for fall applications of anhydrous ammonia, however very dry soils in most of Kansas is a concern. Can anhydrous ammonia be effectively applied to dry soils?

dry soils anhydrous ammonia 

Considerations for fall applications of anhydrous ammonia

For fall applications of anhydrous ammonia, there are a number of factors that must be considered, including soil texture, temperature, and soil moisture. Consider the following guidelines discussed in this article before taking to the field.

fall fertilizer anhydrous ammonia soil temperature 

Can dry soils affect anhydrous ammonia applications?

Many producers are getting ready for fall anhydrous applications. Some producers are applying anhydrous now to fields that will be planted to wheat. However, very dry soils in many areas of Kansas can be a concern. Applications need to be deep enough to reach some moisture to minimize the risk for loss.

dry soils anhydrous ammonia 

Considerations for fall applications of anhydrous ammonia

For fall applications of anhydrous ammonia there are a number of factors to consider including soil temperature, soil texture, and soil moisture. This time of year, it is important to not apply anhydrous while soil temperatures are above a certain threshold. Learn more in this article.

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Considerations for fall applications of anhydrous ammonia

Soils across Kansas are still running above 50F at the 4-inch depth. It is best to delay anhydrous ammonia applications until soil temperatures drop below this threshold. By delaying application until cold weather, over-winter losses of the applied nitrogen can be minimized. Fall applications should be avoided on sandy soils prone to leaching.

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